Monday, August 14, 2006

My Inch Challenge Dumbbell

Out of curiousity, I made an "Inch Challenge Dumbbell" ... sort of. The true Inch Dumbbell weights 172 lbs with a 2.5 inch diameter handle. The dumbbell gets it's name from Thomas Inch, a strongman of the past. He offered people £200 ($1000) if they could lift it off the ground. As the story goes, he never had to pay out the money.

Mine weighs the same, but the handle is only 1.5 inches in diameter. I can dead-lift it with a 1.5 inch handle, but when I increased the handle to only 2 inches, I couldn't get it off the ground.

Thursday, August 03, 2006

Wrapping Hands

Wrapping your hands is a good idea for bag work. In my experience, it supports the bones and muscles in the hands and holds the wrist is proper alignment while punching. I like to use the 108 inch Everlast handwraps. IMHO - The longer 170+ inch wraps are too much material. If you like that kind of thing go to

To start, use a towel to spread your fingers. If you don't do this, the wrap is too tight across the knuckles when you make a fist. There are several ways to wrap your hands. This is just my way to do it. I don't wrap the thumb, so I start with the loop around my ring finger and go down to the wrist.

Next wrap the wrist two full times and go to the knuckles across the back of the hand (The number of times the wrist and knuckles are wrapped between transitions is not fixed. This is just what works for my hands).

Now, wrap the knuckles twice. Make sure the wrap actual covers the knuckles and provides some protection while striking. Be aware, it's very easy to wrap your hands too tightly. A comfortable wrap only comes with practice.

Then, go back down to the wrist across the back of the hand and do one full wrap of the wrist. Notice the transitions (between wrist and knuckles) always cross on the back of the hand.

Go back up to the knuckles and wrap one full turn. Apart from taking some extra turns around the knuckles and wrists, my method is simply a figure eight from knuckles to wrist across the back of the hand.

Go back to the wrist across the back of the hand and finish wrapping at the wrist. I like to finish, by wrapping the wrist and knuckles with a final layer of athletic tape to hold the wrap in place.

The most important point about my method is that transitions always cross on the back of the hand. I prefer the back of the hand because it keeps the bulk of the material away from my palm, so I can close my fist completely and comfortably. Also if you transition across the palm, the wrap loosens-up when you close your fist.

When done correctly, this wrap will be like a glove supporting the hand. You can hit the bag/focus mitts and then grapple or Chi Sao and this wrap will not come apart or get in the way.